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Full text of "Annual report of the Division of Immigration and Americanization"

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BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



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THE COMMONWEALTH OF I.5ASSACHUSETIS 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Dr. Owen B. Kiernan, Commissioner 



ANNUAL REPORT 
of the 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 
For the Year Ending June 30, i960 





BOARD 




of the 




DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 


Term Expires 




1962 


Miss Alice W. 0' Connor , Chairman 


I960 


Mr. Aris tides Andrade 


1962 


Mr. Joseph P* Ram ah 


1961 


Miss Constance Garafalo 


1961 


Mrs. Clementina Langone 


1963 


Mrs. Helen Sutton 



SUPERVISOR OF SOCIAL SERVICE 
Mrs. Te of ilia K. Tattan 

DISTRICT AGENTS 

Mr. Daniel J. Donahue - Fall River Office 

Mr. Andrew W. Ansara - Lawrence Office 

Mr John A. Mclnnes - Springfield Office 

Mr. Edmund B. Meduski - Worcester Office 

SOCIAL WORKERS Bo s ton Office 

Miss Elisabeth B. Lavoie 
Miss Carolyn D. Jackym 
Mr. Guy A. Scutell 






ANNUAL REPORT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, i960 
For the 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMEIilCANIZA TION 

of the 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

YiTith the close of the year on June 30, i960, a6,0l|6 services were rendered 
by the Division of Immigration and Americanization completing the forty- third 
year of service dedicated to; 

(1) bring into sympathetic and mutually helpful relations 
the Commonwealth and its residents of foreign origin ; 

(2) protect immigrants from exploitation and abuse) 

(3) stimulate their acquisition and mastery of English 3 
(h) develop their understanding of American government, 

institutions and ideals $ 
(£) generally promote their assimilation and naturalization! 

as fulfilling its duties outlined for the Division under Chapter 69, Section 11 
of the General Laws, as amended by Chapter U09 of the Acts of 1939 • 

All the offices - Boston, Fall River, Lawrence, Springfield and Worcester - 
showed an increase in services - totally almost three thousand more calls for 
assistance were given This, no doubt, is due to several laws which 'were enacted 
at the beginning of the last fiscal year among which was P.L* 86-363 » Tnis law 
amended immigration quota allotments and created nonquota status for many close 
relatives which meant requests for revalidation of petitions, new affidavits of 
support in reunion of families. Election year always makes persons aware of 
citizenship and obtaining papers for registration and voting 

Also noted in the work this year was the 'greater influx of immigrants from 
South American and Central American countries. Many of the Central American 
women have come to the states as domestics. Formerly, when the quota situation 
did not figure into it, the British West Indies was the locale of many imports 
for domestic service, but now the quota of 100 and the long list awaiting quota 
from these Islands precludes successful applications. The countries in the non- 
quota category as Columbia, Argentina, and even Cuba, have sent such domestics. 

The 'Department of State reported that during the twelve months ending June 
30, i960, a record-breaking number of visitor's visas were issued » 670,833 
persons entered the United States as visitors, for business, pleasure, education 
and other temporary purposes. It was noted that this was 13$ increase over the 
previous year and, no doubt, due in part to President Eisenhowers designation 
of I960 as "Visit the United States of America Year",, 



World situations and tensions always affect immigration and the influx of 
many visitors from Cuba, many of whom would like to remain in the United States 
is the latest group of "freedom seekers" • 

HOW MANY FOREIGN BORH 

Figures of the i960 census are not yet available , but the indication has 
been recorded in the increase" of Massachusetts population of some six per cent 
over the 1950 record of l;,690,52Uo No doubt, the proportion of one half of the 
total population as being of foreign stock' in Massachusetts, i.e., persons, one 
or both of whose parents were foreign born, will still be true. In the past ton 
years, Massachusetts has been the destination of more than 100,000 immigrants. 
The last report of the Federal Immigration Service records nearly 10,000 aliens 
giving Massachusetts as their destination. This figure will show an increase for 
the next fiscal year due to the easing of quota classification for reunion of 
of families operating during fiscal year 1959-1960 o It is interesting to note the 
number of calls for our services is reflected in about the same proportion as 
nationalities of immigrants arriving in the yea.? of .1959' which records anong the 
9,855 destined to Massachusetts Canadian, 1,751$ Italy, 967; United 'Kingdom, 
897; Hungary, 87 IjJ Germany, 817; Ireland;, f8l,' etc Of the total 252,6^1 quota 
and nonquota immigrants admitted last ye:ir, more imrmi grant visas were issued to 
Canadians than any other nationality; 32,558© Germans next with 32,521; Mexicans, 
30,782; British, 25,587; etc 

Massachusetts still ranks seventh in the list of nine states with aliens in 
the United States For the year of i960, Massachusetts recorded 127,710 who 
registered under the alien Registration Act. Their nationalities: 

MASSACHUSETTS - 127,710 (total) 



Canada 


28^938 


Italy 


17^21 


Poland - 


10; 990 


England - 


9^071 


Ireland 


7; 609 


Germany - 


5>837 


U*S,S«R # — 


3,821; 


Japan - 


903 


Mexico - 


-266 


All Other - 


la, 550 



Of the 2,9l;8,973 aliens registered in- the United States during January, i960, 
the Northeast section of the United States, the New England States, lead in the 
number of such registered aliens and records 19$ as those from Canada and the 
United Kingdom; 16.6$, Italian born; 9.3%, German; some Asiatic and Mexican and 
$0% of all other nationalities » This shows that this section of the country has 
many nationalities of the world. Particularly to note will be later statistics 
with the influx of the Spanish speaking persons from South America and Cuba. Al- 
though they are citizens, in Massachusetts it is estimated we have some 6,000 
Puerto Ricans. 



NATIONALITIES OF CLIENTS 

Of the some fifty nationalities recorded, the Italian group with 8,£lr5 
leads the group, Ihis national! try was among the largest to benefit under the 
law of reunion with families as permitted under P.L. 86-363* Ihe many relatives, 
brothers and sisters, registered awaiting their turns in the quota prior to 
December 31, 1953, now became in the nonquota class and were permitted to join 
their relatives in the United States. This law permits the fourth preference 
category person to bring his spouse and minor children and accounts for the many 
calls for our services of affidavits, revalidation requests, etc,, of persons of 
this nationality. The next largest category is that of the United States born 
persons, 6,1±70, Many of our United States born clients act as sponsors for rela- 
tives in affidavits of support,, Many have married foreign- born persons and the 
United States born person, who has spent 'many years abroad, is assisting his 
family in admission to the United States 5,339 persons from Canada were record- 
ed, which reflects the closeness of this country and of the travel between the 
United States and Canada. Many a Canadian entering as a visitor decides to make 
the United States his' home and this results in making sponsorship papers, etc. 
The Portuguese with 3,682 services reflects an increase over last year and, no 
doubt, is because of the provisions of P,L, 86-363 which released many of the 
immigrants waiting their turn in the quota over ten years, as well as permitting 
victims of the earthquake in Fayal, Azores to enter under special laws as non- 
quota. 2,9!?1 services for the Polish borri clients show that numbers coning to 
Massachusetts are families being reunited. Many of the persons coming from Poland 
are the United States born who lived abroad since childhood but who have married 
and now have returned to their country of birth with spouses and children. The 
Greeks also benefited under the new law and this is reflected in the 2,181 ser- 
vices in this group. The Irish with 2,1;5>7 is accounted for in the large group of 
those sponsoring their relatives from that country© Germany and Great Britain 
are countries of birth noted as 1,776 and 1,61|8 services. Persons from almost 
every country in the world are recorded. Massachusetts is indeed the melting pot 
of the foreign born. 



TIE NEWCOMER 

Last year our offices sent some 6,1;00 letters to the newly arrived immigrant 
families, Ihe majority of the arrivals were destined within the radius of 20 
miles of the Boston Office. Our letter to the newcomer advises hin of the ser- 
vices offered by the Commonwealth through our offices in his adjustment of living 
in the United States, Replies are received in many foreign languages and advice 
and direction' is given on problems of schools, job placement, professional 
opportunities, draft information, as well as citizenship and reunion with rela- 
tives of family left abroad, There is the occasional unadjusted person unable to 
find satisfactory fulfillment of employment, the elderly parent torn from home 
roots who cannot adjust in this much busier world which omits her in the hurry 
and scurry of every day living. Many a family unit who has come from abroad in 
a matter of a few years own their own home, are happily engaged in satisfactory 
work. Ihe members of the family have worked and pooled their resources and are 
now economically sound 



Many of the newcomers are professionals - as engineers coming to the many 
electronic concerns in this vicinity, doctors and scientists. Many students, _ 
graduates of our colleges, have found their opportunities in this state and have 
changed to permanent residents. Some marry and change to remain in the state. 
The several air bases and Army posts in the state bring wives of our soldiers 
and then their relatives, from all corners of the' world* Die nationalities are 
many and the complexities of problems very varied, but with the assistance of 
capable workers, many speaking the language of the newcomers, our offices extend 
a welcoming hand' to help in the adjustments of the newcomers to the benefit of 
the Commonwealth, as well as the person of foreign birth. 

IMMIGRATION PROBLEMS 

The most important law enacted in the last fiscal year was P.L. 86-363 which 
changed preferences under the quota regulations to: 

FIRST preference class (skilled technicians) $0% of quota 

plus numbers not used for second and third preference. 

SECOND preference class (parents of U S. citizens 21 years 
of age or over and the unmarried sons or daughters of 
U„S. citizens) 30$ of quota plus numbers not used for 
first and third preference • 

THIRD preference class (spouses and unmarried sons or 

daughters of lawful permanent resident aliens) 20$ of 
quota plus numbers not used for first and second 
preference e 

FOURTH preference class (brothers, sisters, married sons 
or daughters of U.S. citizens, their accompanying 
spouses and children) $0% of the quota numbers not 
used for first, second and third preference. 

NONPREFERENCE (other applicants)' 

Numbers not used for first, second, third and 
fourth preference. 

It permitted adult, unmarried children of aliens to be classified in the third 
preference category, as well as unmarried children of citizens to get second 
preference priority,. Also the law further provides that persons in the fourth 
preference category, brothers and sisters of U#S, citizens, can bring their 
spouses and minor children when their turn is reached. If they have been await- 
ing their turn in the quota prior to December 31* 1953 under approved petitions 
made prior to January 1, 1959, as many have from countries as Italy, Portugal, 
Greece and West Indies, they are now in the nonquota category. As well as causing 
many family reunions, it has caused separations. We have several cases where the 
citizen father in the United States has made the petition for his widowed daughter 
who has minor children. Because she is now in the second preference category, 
visa may be available soon to her but her minor children have no preference and 
the law only permits the mother to petition for them after her legal admission to 
the United States She could create third preference categorical standing for 
them but for countries such as Greece, P rtugal, Italy, in this category, the wait 
is estimated to be three to nine yearslUIJ 



>~-r.* 









However, this law benefited many. In one instance, it benefited a family 
of 25 who came from Portugal. The mother, a citizen by birth, had lived abroad 
many years but never had lost her U.S. citizenship. Her husband died and she 
returned to the United States with two children as citizens. She left behind 
four adult children, married, and who had families of their own - a total of 2$ 
persons * When this law became effective, she had to revalidate her earlier 
petition in their behalf as they were waiting for quota since prior to December, 
1953 • Her earnings as a restaurant worker- were insufficient to give guarantee 
against the family becoming public charges, as required, and some thirty rela- 
tives joined in making affidavits of support for them. The close members of the 
family assisted her in providing air transportation and even the Airline coopera- 
ted in having s special flight for the entire family. They arrived on "a Saturday 
morning with more than a hundred relatives to 'meet them at the airport. The 
greetings and reunions were warm and touching. In the four months since they 
have been in the United States, with assistance from their relatives, each head 
of the family has found work, have their own homes and some of their children 
already able to get along in speaking English,, 

Provisions permitting orphans to come to the United States as nonquota has 
been extended to June 30, l°6l» We have assisted in filling applications for 
Greek, Italian and West Indian children. The law still specifies such a child to 
be at least without one parent and under lk years of age, etc. 



also had a number of parents and spouses enter the state under waiver 
of health requirements. They have been admitted to T. B. 'hospitals immediately 
on their arrival into the United States for further study It has been inter- 
esting to note that not one has remained in the hospital for any period longer 
than four months and has been released. 

Tnis year has noted an increase in change of status cases and many of them 
under waivers for exchange students and visitors. Many persons in such cate- 
gories have married U S. citizens, and because many hardships would have been 
created in separation of families for two years if the law was enforced, waivers 
have been granted Many engineers, doctors and scientists, teachers, have been 
granted permission to remain in the United States after proper application and 
procedure. 

The U.S. Immigration Officials have more strictly interpreted the laws as 
regarding deserting seamen and we had a number of cases, because it was not 
possible to adjust status by going to Canada, the husband had to return to his 
country of birth in his application for visa to return to the United States and 
be reunited with his family for permanent stay 

LEGISLATION 

Immigration to the United States has always been a factor in the building 
of America. In this election year, it has been a subject in both major parties' 
platforms,' and perhaps the many pending bills affecting quotas may yet "receive 
attention c Many legislators are advocators of changing the quota laws. The 
strongest sentiment seems to be to change the year on which the quota 'status is 
based so that the law would be based on l/6 of 1% of persons in the U„ S. recorded 
in i960, rather than in 1920. 



The Refugee Year of i960 brought enactment of P.L, 86-8I18 which provides for 
a limited number of refugees to cone through June 30, 1962 of about 8,000 persons 9 
The lav; provides that 2% of the number 'of refugees taken by the rest of the world 
be allowed to core to the United States © Tnis law also permits 500 more families 
to come from the Azores who were Fayal Earthquake victims and another 3*000 
Dutch refugees and families from Indonesia© 

The latest developments in Cuba, with many of its nationals in the Unitec 
States showing a reluctance to return, would indicate that some action may have 
to be taken for this group,, 

CITIZENSHIP 

Election year always brings an increase in citizenship applications. 5,289 
persons were admitted to citizenship by naturalization in this state. Our 
figures show that we filled 3,0?1 applications for naturalization, This year 
brought to an awakening a number of American born women married prior to Septem- 
ber 22, 1922 to alien spouses whose later naturalization had not benefited them 
and who found that a repatriation application was needed in order to permit them 
to register and vcte c Many persons in moving from one city to another who found 
it necessary to register could not find their certificates, had to have applica- 
tions for duplicate certificates. Also the many who derived citizenship through 
their parents, we helped fill forms arid gather the evidence necessary for the 
Certificate of Derivative Citizenship. Applications for Certificates of Deriva- 
tive Citizenship in nany cases require much research and correspondence. As in 
the case of the Russian born person who entered the United States as an infant 
whose close relatives are dead© He seemed to have no means of ascertaining 
necessary information of date of arrival^ port of entry, etc., as well as being 
able to produce birth records } marriage records, etc., unattainable from abroado 
School records were located, census records applied for, as well as assistance in 
registry procedure to make a record took many letters and timet 

Most of the applicants for citizenship are the more recently arrived immi- 
grants, Many are anxious to become naturalized and be eligible to petition for 
close relatives© Some have been unable to pass the examination the first time 
and have been helped by referrals to citizenship classes, as well as assistance 
in preparation for such examination by issuance of necessary pamphlets including 
our booklet, Questions and Answers in Preparation for Naturalization Examination, 
We distribute over 10,000 such booklets annually. 

We had' 288 persons who applied for Declaration of Intention even though such 
Declaration, or First Paper, is no longer required in naturalization procedure," 
These applicants needed this document for such purposes as to enlist in the U.S. 
Armed Services, for Nurses examinations or some job qualifications. 

Fewer "are the more elderly applicants resident in the United States for many, 
many years. The nr re recent newcomer, eager to "take advantages offered in the 
"Best Country in the Vi'orld" are in the majority© 



COOPERATIVE AGENCY AND CONFERENCE PARTICIPATION 

In our work, we have many referrals from private agencies, as well as public 
welfare bureaus, Social Security Offices and other state offices to give techni- 
cal information on citizenship and immigration questions, as well as translation 
services* We have contacts with agencies "working in behalf of orphans and refugees 
and cooperation has been mutually helpful, Tne Division holds memberships in 
organizations such as the American immigration and Citizenship Conference, the 
Intergroup Relations Council, the Committee for Service to the Foreign Born of 
the United Community Services, the Adult Educators Association of Massachusetts, 
We have actively participated in the Massachusetts Social Workers Conference in 
program arranging. We participated in a newspaper conference of Yfcrld Refugee 
Year when Dean Sayre, the head of the World Refugee Committee was in Boston* We 
have taken part in the Massachusetts Adult Civic Educators Program, as well as 
the Massachusetts Association Teachers of Adults and have attended many meetings 
of cooperative agencies,, Our relations with the Federal Service is mutually 
beneficial. We have helped many students from colleges with inf orma tioh in their 
writing of papers, or thesis, in some immigration or citizenship aspect. 

The present state of world affairs with its cold wars, growing unrest, will 
continue to bring many problems. Without a doubt the calls for our services will 
come in increasing numbers and a program such as ours "to bring into sympathetic 
and mutually helpful relations the Commonwealth and its residents of foreign 
origin" is still most important,, As never before, the foreign born are subjected 
to propaganda from nations hostile to the democratic form of government and 
Massachusetts has a program such as ours to combat this meaace. 

FALL RIVER OFFICE 

The Fall River Office completed the fiscal year ending June 30, i960 with a 
total of k)h39 services rendered to clients These clients came from thirty-six 
localities in the Southeastern Massachusetts area, Tnis total of hjb39 was an 
increase in services amounting to 266 from the previous fiscal year© The records 
show that for each and every fiscal year for the past ten years there has been a 
steady increase in services rendered, 

Tne bulk of the time consuming operations at the Fall River* Office is the 
numerous inquiries of clients seeking inform-ation on citizenship, immigration, 
travel and their 'numerous problems involving writing letters to local, state and 
federal agencies. Also we write letters to the Department of State, Foreign 
Service Offices throughout the world, complete applications for citizenship; 
certificates of derivative citizenship^ affidavits of support and assist visitors 
and foreign students with their problems. 



One must be cognizant of the nationality makeup here in Southeastern 
Massachusetts with reference to its immigration and citizenship problems. More 
than half the services rendered in this office 'are to people of Portuguese nation- 
ality. Ihey are mainly natives of St. Michael, Azores; Cape Verde Island; 
Madeira Island and the continent of Portugal who have an annual quota of I4.38 with 
a separate quota of 100 for the Cape Verde Island. These people of Portuguese 
nationality are a very close family people and anytime they have the opportunity 
to petition for mother, father, sisters or brothers, they do so» With the enact- 
ment of Public Lav/ 86-363, it qualified hundreds of brothers and sisters for non- 
quota status from this area, The majority of these brothers and sisters are 
married persons and, therefore, included are their spouses and children. This 
law increased the workload of the Fall River Office tremendously The Fayal 
Refugee Program also 'added more work and problems to the ever increasing amount 
of work in this area The expanding operations of the Otis Air Force Base and the 
population ex-plosion on Cape Cod has meant a larger number of clients from this 
Cape Cod area are now seeking the services of this Fall River Office 9 This Agent 
makes weekly visits to New Bedford, Massachusetts and the people in that area 
look forward to this weekly visit. It usually is a full do.y of work and at times 
it appears that more time should be spent in the New Bedford Area 

Letters of welcome are sent to newcomers in this area c This office has 
received file cards on more than 700 new arrivals during the past fiscal year. 

In the past few years , Congress has initiated numerous Public Laws which have 
opened the doors to more immigration above and beyond the annual quotas of coun- 
tries. These new laws have added problems and additional work to the entire 
Division. 

There is no question of the great need of the Division in this area as the 
many calls for our services testify in these ever-changing times a 

LAW RENCE OFFI CE 

A total of i;,28l services to clients was rendered by the Lawrence District 
Office during "the fiscal year ending June 30, 19o0. Tnis figure represents' an 
increase of 533 services over the previous fiscal year and an increase of 1,027 
services over the fiscal year ending June 30, 195>8© 

The services most frequently given during the past fiscal year involved the 
answering of requests for information and advice by individuals anxious to bring 
relatives and friends from other countries,, 

Many letters were written on behalf of clients by this office to United 
States Consuls abroad and to Government Agencies within this country. 

Over l£ countries were represented by clients seeking assistance at the 
Lawrence Office during the year. The greatest number of persons visiting our 
office were native-born Americans. Individuals of Italian birth were second, 
followed by Canada, Syria and I^banon, Greece and Poland in that order. 



Clients who visited the Lawrence District Office during the past fiscal year 
resided in 35 cities and towns throughout Massachusetts , The greatest number of 
our clients were residents of Lawrence proper, Lowell had the second largest 
number of' persons served This Agent is visiting Lowell one day a week* Methuen, 
Haverhill, Andovcr and North Andover were also well represented by clients visit- 
ing the Lav/re nee Office , 

Several interesting and dramatic cases were handled by the Lawrence District 
Office during the past fiscal year. One involved the immigration of five members 
of a Ukranian family from Poland, three of whom were afflicted with tuberculosis. 
The husband had previously been imprisoned in Siberia for ' anti-communist activi- 
ties. This family was reunited in Lawrence in June, I960. 

Another case that is still active involves the attempts of an American citi- 
zen to have his son returned to the United States from the Soviet Union© In 
I9I46, our client's wife announced to her husband that she was returning to the 
Soviet Union and was taking their -three children with her. Despite her husband 1 s 
violent objections, she fled during the night with their two daughters and their 
son, who was six years of age at that time. Since then, visitors returning from 
the Soviet Union have informed our client that his wife greatly regrets her 
impetuosity. This office has been conducting correspondence with the United 
States Embassy in Moscow and the State Department in Washington regarding this 
case, 'The Embassy reports that their letters to the son have never been acknow- 
ledged. The -father states that his son has never received his letters. Return- 
ing visitors, however, have reported that the son is well and is awaiting the day 
when he can return to the United States. 

Letters of Welcome were sent to all newcomers in this area. Many new 
arrivals were counseled regarding life in the United States with a view toward 
their successful assimilation in their new environment. 

We interviewed individuals with personal, health, social or employment 
problems and referred them to the proper resources. 

Several items pertaining to the various aspects of the immigration and 
naturalization laws were submitted by this office to the Lawrence and Lowell 
newspapers and radio stations. 

'Excellent cooperation is continuing between this office and the private, 
city, state and federal agencies in this area. 

Translations of documents written in Italian, Arabic, French and German were 
made by the workers in this office. Interviews were frequently conducted in the 
native tongues of persons who speak the above languages but who know no English. 

SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 



A 



it the close of the past fiscal year 14,756 services were recorded for persons 
living in the four Western Counties of our Commonwealth. This figure shows an 
increase of 760 cases over the previous year. 



Our "statistics show that persons came to us fron forty communities in our 
district© In addition, 68 persons, former residents of our state, contacted us 
for information and advice© 

Of the forty-four nationalities recorded, citizens of Canada were the 
leading racial' group. They were followed in order by natives of the United 
States, Poland, Greece, Germany, Great Britain, "Vest Indies and Ireland, 

With passage of P„L. 86-363 in September, 19^9 benefiting persons registered 
for immigration visas prior to December, 1953, letters were written to American 
Consular offices in Italy and Greece informing them of the desire of people in 
our community to have relatives qualifying under this Act join them in the United 
States From time to time we were flooded with telephone calls inquiring about 
the numerous proposals made to Congress by members of the Congress and especially 
those proposed by President Eisenhower in March of i960 to relax restrictions to 
allow many more people to take up residence in the United States,, 

Vj'ith the extension of the Orphan's Act we were able to assist several former 
native West Indians in preparing applications to sponsor children for adoption* 
These children were born in the British YJest Indies© 

Many of our applicants for citizenship included the wife and stepchildren 
of Air Force personnel at Festover Air Force Base, In addition, applications 
were made for certificates of citizenship in bohalf of children born abroad of 
United States citizen parent or parents serving in our Armed Forces, Speedy 
action and special attention was required in the majority of these cases of 
persons to be naturalized or to obtain certificates to prove citizenship as they" 
were dependents of airmen to whom orders for overseas assignment had been issued e 

During the year, letters were sent to ifl6 new immigrants destined to live 
within our district. These letters welcomed them to our Commonwealth and advised 
them of the purpose of our office and the services available to help them adjust 
their lives in our country. The response from these letters and the expression 
of gratitude was most gratifying. 

The District Agent attended the naturalization sessions held at Superior Court 
at Springfield and enjoyed the contacts made with the Clerk of Court, the presiding 
Justices, and the Examiners from the Immigration and Naturalization Service, He- 
participated in the, "I Am An American Day'"' program sponsored by the Bureau of 
Adult Education of the City of Springfield, Ke continued to cooperate with the 
Americanization Supervisors and teachers who made contact with him. 

The public and private agencies were most cordial in their cooperation with 
us, Vfe continue to receive complete and valuable assistance fron the representa- 
tives of the United States Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization 
Service, as well as Social Agencies and Schools, 



WORCESTER OFFICE 

Clients assisted during the past year numbered 5,631 services executed for 
them. The Agent has completed a year of duty with the Division e 

Worcester is a city that has a number of well-known higher institutions of 
learning. These schools enroll students and trainees from every corner of the 
globe, as well as employing teachers on their staffs,, We have calls from many 
persons at Assumption College, Becker Junior College, Clark University, Holy- 
Cross College, Worcester Junior College and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 
There are eight hospitals in the city with a number of foreign interns and nurses, 
and also the world famous Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology located 
in an outskirting town. Even though these intellectuals are studying here, they 
also impart valuable knowledge and skills* 

Our office has given information to many in this group concerning the proce- 
dures to change status as they had entered as visitor or student These persons 
were in the category whose skills were urgently needed in the United States and 
came from countries where first preference quota was not current e Some under the 
Exchange Program had to get waivers. By adjusting their status to permanent 
resident aliens, many are now employed in strategic positions. 

We completed a multitude of Extension of Stay applications for all types 
of visitors in this area 

Some typical cases that were handled during the year for which we still await 
outcomes are: 

A naturalized citizen trying to have his wife and thrue children join 
him in the United States<> They recently were allowed to leave Russia 
to return to Poland. He has not seen his family since 19l|0 when they 
were separated by the war. Proper petitions and affidavit of support 
were made, as well as correspondence with the Consul© 

A family of eight hoping to migrate to the United States from Italy, 
^hey missed out under the Refugee Act, but may- benefit under Public 
Law 86-363 o The health condition of the woman, the principal 
beneficiary, is delaying the issuance of visas at the present time. 

A family of eight born in the country of Jordan, whose annual quota 
is 100 o Four visas have been issued and four more are awaited. 

An orphan petition for a Korean Child by a couple born in the 
United States. 

An adopted 16 year old daughter of an American couple who was not* 
accorded l|th preference due to P.L. 86-363, of September 22, 1959, 
which ended this procedure. She was adopted in a Polish Court on 
September 2h, 1959. The private bill for her relief before Congress, 
introduced by a local Congressman, appears very promising. 

Mich research of the minute details and correspondence are involved in these 
and similar cases, but the "social good" derived from successful outcomes of cases 
balances the anxieties shared with the client and hard work in fulfilling our 
duties of our program. 



1-3 PS 

PS 

Statistic 


O 

1 

al Detaj 


SPRINGFIELD 


O 

CD 

$» WORCESTER 


8 

co 

pq 

All Oi 


< 

En 

O 
Eh 


Service 
For the fiscal year 7/1/59 - 6/30/60 


s Given 
2,109 


Ofi 
2,883 


fices 


I„ INFORMATION 2,130 


3,711+ 


8,189 


19,025 


1. Booklets, forms, blanks 265 


202 


U87 


3hl 


1,1+1+1 


2,71+3 


2. Citizenship 901 


'578 


1,085 


963 


893 


1+,U20 


3» njnmigration TUB 


1,092 


1,019 


1,690 


5,1+03 


9,91+8 


1+. Travel 32 


128 


251+ 


665 


81+ 


1,163 


5. Other 157 


109 


39 


1+8 


368 


751 


II. FORMS FILLED 978 


816 


711 


979 


6 3 h3h 


9,918 


6„ N-105 9 


h 


2 


1 


17 


33 


7. N-300 11 


16 


15 


32 


•211+ 


'288 


8. N-J+00 331 


132 


250 


266 


2,092 


3,071 


9. N-600 58 


1+3 


57 


69 


1+75 


702 


10 o N-585 2 


h 


7 


h 


138 


155 


11, Other Natur. Forms 33 


20 


h3 


39 


155 


290 


12. 1-131 1 


9 


12 


30 


9h 


-11+6 


13. 1-133 151 


85 


77 


87 


-m 


l',183 


±h* Other IQnmigo Forms 226 


153 


5ii 


156 


1,119 


1,708 


15 AR-11 30 


60 


78 


9h 


172 


h3h 


16. 1-90 22 


17 


h3 


ho 


262 


'381+ 


17 * AR-53 or 514 101+ 


273 


13 


161 


913 


1,521* 


III. EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 579 


565 


38U 


383 


3,013 


l+,92l+ 


18 ♦ Affidavit of support 193 


11+9 


126 


2U8 


2,1+96 


3,212 


19 Affidavit of facts 6 


22 


2 


13 


11+7 


'190 


20. Other notarial 380 


39h 


256 


110 


370 


1,510 


21. Assurances 


- 


- 


12 


- 


12 


IV. OTHER SERVICES $3k 


689 


191 


39h 


7,609 


9,1+17 


22. Change of Status 1+7 


22 


111 


111 


329 


1+26 


'dim Appearance at hearings 19 


1 


- 


5 


185 


-210 


^l+» Interpretation & Trans. 11 


67 


- 


156 


■827 


1,061 


25 • Letters rfTjTf 


591 


177 


217 


6,225 


7,651+ 


z6 # Other 13 


8 


- 


2 


1+3 


66 


V. INTERVIEW 218 


102 


587 


161 


1,691+ 


2,762 


27* Newcomer Interview 218 


100 


582 


161 


1,681+ 


2,71+5 


28. Refugee Interview 


- 2 


' 5 


- 


10 


17 


TO TAL U,U39 


U,281 


i+,756 


5,631 


26,939 


1+6,01+6 



7/: 


L/59 - 6/30/60 
Albania 


Fall j Spring- I Wor- ; 
River J Lawrence field i cester ; 
Nationality and Ethnic Statistics 


Boston 
100 


TOTAL 


l. 


m m 


mm 


5 


l 

68 ! 


173 


2. 


Africa 


- 


1 


10 


7 ! 


56 


7U" r 


3. 


Armenia (R. or T*) 


- 


B9 


- 


160 i 


60 


309 


1*. 


Australia 


- 


2 


l 


13 1 


60 


76 


5. 


Austria 


11 


1*3 


26 


7 1 


135 


222 
_ 


6. 


Belgium 


8 


11* ' 


16 


! 9 J 


71* 


121 


7. 


Bulgaria 


~" 








H* 


H* 


8. 


Canada 


im 


631 


701 


620 i 


3203 


5339 


9. 


Central America 


36 


am 


33 


7 1 


367 


1*1*3 


10. 


China 


72 


5 


12 


21* ! 


531* 


61*7 


11. 


Czechoslovakia 


1* 


1 


1* 


12 i 


71 


92 


12. 


Denmark 


21 


5 


7 


21 ! 


62 


126 


13. 


Egypt 


17 


18 


— 


1 ! 


bO 


S 116 


Hi. 


Estonia 


- 


— 


— 


i " 'j 


26 


26 


15. 


Finland 


- 




2 


96 | 


59 


157 


16. 


France 


11 


66 


55 


116 ! 


323 


1 -573 


17. 


Germany 


91 


201* 


327 


291 i 


b63 


l;776 


18. 


Great Britain 


60 


211 


311 


26b ! 


79b 


l,bhti 


19. 


Greece 


1*1 


296 


352 


233 ! 


1259 


2,181 


20. 


Hungary 


3 


61* 


16 


26 j 


26TT 


377 


21. 


Iceland 


- 


- 


*c 


2 j 


13 


15 


22. 


India 


2 


3 


3 


22 '■ 


151 


181 


23. 


Indonesia 


3 


1 


8 


— ; 


31 


U3 


2lw 


Iran 


- 


- 


- 


9 ! 


61 


70 


25. 


Iraq 


- 


- 


— 


_ ] 


2U 


" 2U 


26. 


Ireland 


ho 


69 


214* 


209 


1895 


2,U57 


27. 


Israel 


17 




2 


27 1 


121 


. -167 


28. 


Italy 


103 


711 


619 


1138 ! 


597U 


8 3 5U5 


29. 


Japan 


15 


3 


87 


37 


202 


3hU 


30. 


Jordan 


2 


7 


2 


6 


3^ 


55 


31. 


Korea 


- 


11 


21 


13 


105 


131 


32. 


Latvia 


11 


3 


2 


13 


211* 


21*3 


33. 


Lithuania 


l* 


86 


9 


230 


U65 


791* 


31*. 


Mexico 


- 


7 




5 


33 


1*5 


35. 


Netherlands 


1 


2 


30 


32 


109 


171* 


36. 


New Zealand 




8 


™™ 




22 


30 


37. 


Norway 


125 


- 


8 


19 


58 


210 


38. 


Pakistan 


- 


2 


- 


2 


2 


6 


39. 


Palestine 


3 


5 


- 


— 


13 


21 


1*0. 


Philippines 


1*1 


16 


6 


12 


212 


-287 


1*1. 


Poland 


169 


273 


k3$ 


717 


1357 


2,951 


1*2. 


Portugal 


2U09 


220 


158| 


38 


957 


3,682 


1*3. 


Rumania 


1 


32 


9 


3 


71 


116 


1*1. 


South America 


22 


17 


28 | 


U* 


322 


1*33 


1*5. 


Spain 


21 


27 


21 


5 


11*3 


217 


1*6. 


Sweden 


9 


1 


37 


90 


115 


252 


1*7. 


Switzerland 


- 


7 


3 


9 


31 


5o 


1*8. 


Syria & Lebanon 


5« 


291* 


i 59 


107 


2U2 


760 


1*9. 


Turkey (Not Armenia) 
Trieste 


1* 


57 


1 h3 


87 


271* 


1*65 


50. 


- 


— 




- 


_ 


_ 


51. 


Ukraine 


2 


1 


26 


1* 


51* 


87 


52. 


U.S.S.R. 


20 


26 


91*. 


1*8 

652 

1*7 

17 

• 8 

5,631 


1*1*7 

3738 

732 

202 

' 89 

2h,939 


635 


53. 


United States 


703 


72U 


653 

272 

12 


6 5 U70 


5h. 

55. 


West Indies 
Yugoslavia 


13 


6 
9 


1,070 
2W 


56. 


Other Countries 
TO T A L 


2 
U,h39 


1 
l*,28l 


- 6 
1*,756 


-106 
U6,01*6 



Fiscal Year 
7/1/59 - 6/30/60 



j 

lo ; calitie|s 



A3|l 
Offices 



Abington 
Acton 



FALL { 

RIVER I IAWRENCE 



_ 5 



SPRINGFIELD ! ViTORCESTER j BOSTON ; TOTAL 



1U 

"25" 



lit 



20 



IF 



Acushnet 

Adams " 

Agawam 



13 



3 



1 
T 



10 



me" 



107 



Ames bury 

Amherst^ 

Andover 



10 



16 



3 



V> 



20 



17T 



16T 



7 



Arlington 

Ashland " 

Athol 



_ • 



331 



IT 



333 
T 



IF" 



Attleboro 
Auburn " 

Avon 



w 



23 



7F 



B7 
73" 



13 



13 



Ayer 

Barnstable 

Barre 

Bedford" 



Bellingham 

Belmont 

Berlin 



Beverly 

Billerica - 

Blacks tone" 

Bolton 

Boston" 

Bourne 



Boxborough 

B oxford " 

Boylston 
Bradford 



Brain tree 

Bridgewater" 

Brockton 



Brookline 
Burlington" 



Cambridge 

Canton * 

Carlisle 
Charlton 
Chatham " 



Chelmsford 
Chelsea 



Id 



W 



3 



19 



W 



«- \ 



— s 



_ i 






"6" 



121 



— 1 



62 



1 
"2~2lT 



3 

w 



w 



7 



"26- 



1 



21 



w 



3T 



7 



"32T 
"37T 



TT 



1779 



37 



3 



13 



397 



158" 



15 



7 



W 



1 

"22T 



9 



90 



39 



3 



2 I - 2 

1191b I 11,9^3U 



29 



3 



"5F 



19 
"5T 



38" 



331 
371 



ia 



1,787 



37 



3 



T 
38" 



392 



FALL I 

RIVER : LAWRENCE I SPRINGFIEID 



[ 
WORCESTER! BOSTON; 7 TA L 



Chester 


— 


i 
— i 


3 | 




~* j 


3 


Chic ope e 


- 


mm . 


5W 1 


i ! 


9 1 


55» 


Clinton 


- 


- 




Uo | 


2 | 


U2 


Cohasset 




j 


- 


- 


26 i 


26 


Concord 


_ ! 


l 




- 


52 \ 


52 


Dan vers 


_ 


ir 1 


....... j 


' i 


i 

i 

5 i 


22 


Dartmouth 


87 | 






1 


2 i 


«9 


Dedham 


i 


"~ i 


~ 


- j 


170 


170 


Deerfield 


- 


1 


5 




1 


6 


Dennis 


- 


— 


- 


I _ 1 

t 


2 I 


2 


Dighton 


23 


~" t 


1 ' 


- j 


- 


23 


Dover 


- 






1 - i 


ih 1 


1U 


Dracut 


- 


85 | 


— 


! • 
1 " f 


? 


92 


Dudley 


__ ! 




— 


1 1U i 




11* 


Duxbury 




— 1 




1 - ! 

: : 


95 \ 


95 


East Brookfield 


: 


i 
I 




! 

! 

1 2 | 


j 


2 


East Longmeadow 


— i 




66 


— 




66 


Eas thampton 


- 


— 1 


20 


j _ : 


_ I 


20 


E as ton 


- 


: 


- 


- 


12 


12 


Essex 


— 




- 


- 


11 


11 


Everett 


- 


- 


— 


— 


371 


371 


Fairhaven 


85 1 


. , 


^ ^ 


i ! 

: • 

j ■ • i 


h 1 


- 89 


Fall River 


2323 j 




- 


m . t 


13 


2,336 


Falmouth 


h5 1 




- 




27 i 


72 


Fitchburg 


— 


i ! 


- 


I 13 1 


7 


21 


Foxborougti 


- 


- 


- 




11 


11 


Framingham 


— 




- 


\ \ 


177 


177 


Franklin 


3 




- 


\ h i 


Bo 1 


87 


Freetown 


8 \ 


- 


- 


• — 1 


2 i 


10 


Gardner 


_ 


mi 


mm ^ 


1 30 | 


16 


U6 


Georgetown 


- 


l 


- 


- 


a 1 


9 


Gloucester 


U 


- 


- 


i ■ 


105 I 


109 


Grafton 


- 


1 


- 


! 65 1 


2 


67 


Granby 


- 


i 


20 




1 


21 


Granville 


- 


- 


1 






1 


Great Barrington 


- 


- 


3 




5 1 


a 


Greenfield 


- 


- i 


2 




3 


5 


Groton 


~ 


1 1 


- 




a 1 


9 


Grove land 


- 


23 j 


- 


- 


h 1 


27 


Hadley 


_ 


»• 


8 




1 j 


9 


Halifax' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Hamilton 


- 


5 ! 


- 


- 


9 


lit 


Hampden 


- 


- 


7 


~ 


- 


7 


Hanover 


- 


- 


— 


- 


5 


8 





FALL ! 
RIVER j 


LAWRENCE 


j 

' SPRINGFIELD 


WORCESTER 


i 

BOSTON | T 


T A L 


Hanson 




^ ^ 


i 

— 




j 
18 1 


13 


Hardwick 




- 


- 


2 


k 


6 


Harvard 




__ 


i 


2 


5 


7 


Harwich 


- 


- 


2 ! 

■ t . — 


2 


Hatfield 


I 


- 


1 




_ 


1 


Haverhill 




301 






16 


317 


Hingham 


i 


- 


37 


37 


Holbrook 


1 


- 


- 




17 j 


17 


Holden 


2. i 


- 


_ 


Ub 




U6 


Ho His ton 


11 ' i 


- 


- 


- 


8 1 


3 


Holyoke 




- 


! 27U 


1 


5 1 


290 


Hopedale 


- 


— 


- 




1 1 


1 


Hopkinton 


— t 


- 




2 


5 ! 


7 


Hubbardston 


- ! 


- 


j 

! 


1 


• 
- 


1 


Hudson 


- 


- 


- 


11 


51 ! 


92 


Hull 


- 


- 


- 


— 


^7 i 


kl 


Ipswich 


j 


mm 


j 




1 

68 | 


68 


Kingston 


"" | 


mm 


1 mm 




1 I 


1 


Lancaster 




mm 


• 


10 


56 I 


- 66 


Lawrence 


- 


2055 


1 




5U | 


2,109 


Leicester 




— 




£ 




53 


Lenox 


- 


— 


i mm 


— 


3 l 


3 


Leominster 


— ! 


- 


i 


9 


52 1 


61 


Leverett 


- 


— 


! 5 




12 j 


17 


Lexington 


— j 


- 






111 | 


111 


Lincoln 


— 


- 


- 


- 


, 22 1 


22 


Littleton 


- 


1 


- 


- 


6 1 


7 


Longme adow 




- 


1 5k 


i ■ "■ ■ —■-■■— 

j 


1 2 I 


56 


Lowell 




«U5 


- 


1 


1 57 1 


903 


Ludlcw 


i 


- 


Ill 


- 


15 1 


127 


Lunenburg 


- 


— 






T~ 


k 


Lynn 


«m> 


- 


- 




Wh \ 


kttk 


Lynnfield 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3k \ 


3k 


Maiden 




H 


^^ 


i mm 


UOO 1 


hob. 


Manchester 


- 


- 


— 




16 ! 


16 


Mansfield 


1 


™" 


- 


— 


15 ! 


16 


MarbleheacT 


; - 


i 


bk \ 


6U 


Marion 


2 1 


- 


- 


• - 


— 


2 


Marlborough 


- ; 


- 


- 


1 5 


$1 ! 


62 


Marshfield 


7 | 


M* 


- 


! 

| 


i£ ' 


k2 


Mattapoisett 


- 


i 


i 29 . 


7 


Maynard 


p _ < 


1 


- 


- 


30 


Medfield 


- 


- 


- 


77 


77 


Medford 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 kit : 


m 


Medway 


— 


- 


- 


— 


13 : 


13 



FALL 
RIVER 



Melrose 
Merrimac 
Me time n 



LAWRENCE 



SPRINGFIELD WORCESTER ' BOSTON 'TOT A L 



i 



91 



92 



352^ 



IF 



367 



Middleborough 
Middlefield 

Middle ton 

Milford 

Mi llbur ~ 

Millis 

Mil t on 

Monson 



T"~T 



W 



17 



1 



23 



21 



1 
T 



90 



W 



w 



12 



12 



p. j 



111 



TUT 



IT 



12 



Montague 



T 



Nan ant 



3 



26 



7 



26 



Nantucket 
Natick 



121 



121 



"52" 



Needham 

New Bedford 

New Salem ] 

Newbury 



- 



„. ! 



"6T 



123B" 



1 



FF 



TT 



1,293 



TT 



Newburyport 

Newton " 

Norfolk 



W 



13 b 



37 
1W 



- 



North Adams 
North Andover 



F 



T 



ToF 



North Attleborough 
North Brookfield_ 

North Reading 

Northampton 

Northboroug h 

Nor thbridge 

Norton 

N orwe 11 

Norwood 



15" 



7 



27 



■» i 



13 



¥ 



3J 



10 



IF 



29 



13 



112 



17 



1 



31 



tit 



29 



T3F 



138" 



Oakham 
Orange 
Orleans 
Otis 



_ ! 



7 



Oxford 



TT 



1? 



"5" 



17 



Palmer__ 
Paxton 
Pe abody 
Pelham 



20 



27 



TT 



12* 



Z\ loT 



161T 



1 



I 



IF 



Pembroke 

Pepperell__ 

Petersham 

PittsfielcT 



11 



IF 



T 



h 



T 



2 

IF 



Plainfield_ 
Plainville" 

Plymouth " 

Prince ton 



Province town 



Quincy 



FALL I ; i 

RIVER ! LAWRENCE I SPRINGFIELD j WORCESTER ! BOSTON 



2 



TOTAL 



39 



.j.. 






h69 ' 



7 



TIT 



8 



U70 



Randolph 

RaynhamJ^ 

Reading 

Rehoboth 

Revere 



k9 



19 



12 



h9 



31 



3T 



IT 



"277 



T 



"277 



RocklandT 
Rockport" 

Rowley " 

Rutland 



20 



10 



¥ 



20 



10 



la 



37 



Salem 



_ ! 



iy 



Hi5 



Salisbury 

Sandwich 

Saugus 



18 



T 



■^o-T 



18 



T 



3o 



Scituate 
Seekonk 
Sharon 
Sherborn 
Shirley " 



_ 



93 \ 



8 



93 



"K 



_ i 



21 



21 



"8" 



7 



"B" 



Shrewsbury 

Somerset 

Somerville 



South Hadley 
Southampton 
SouthborougE" 
Southbridge 

Southwick 

Spencer 



Springfield 

Sterling " 

Stockb ridge 

Stone ham " 

S tough ton 
Stow 
Stur bridge 

Sudbury 

Sutto n 
Swamps co tt 
Swansea 



w 



uir 



1231 



36 

T 



IW 



w 



2b" 



3 



3 



11 



nr 



122 



"9F 



Tt 



W 






139 



^163 



1,231 
~33" 



7 



10 



^~W~ 



17057 



3£~ 

.12U 

~8T- 

2__ 

9 

~TT 
To— 

~35~ 



' • ' '•". ...,.-..-...,.. 4 





FALL 
RIVER 


i 

i 

LAWRENCE 


I 

SPRINGFIELD 


WORCESTER] 


BOS TON 


TO T A L 


Taunton 


120 




i 


i 


_ 


39 159 


Temple ton 


- 




- 


- 


- 


3 , 3 


Tewksbury 


- 


7 


- 


- 


21 1 2b 


Topsfield ' 


- 


J 


- 


- 


- 


b 6 


Towns end 


- 


- 


- 


1 1 


3 li 


Truro 


- 


2 




_ i 


- i 2 


Upton 


„. , 


mm 


1 


u 


- i k 


Uxbri&ge 


- 




- 




27 


2 j 29 


Wakefield 


mm 




WW 




.., 


109 109 


Walpole 


- 


- 


- 


- 


50 1 5b 


Vfaltham 


- 


- 


- 


- 


51U 5U* 


Ware 


- 


— 


- 


- 


U 1 i; 


ViTareham 


5 


- 


6 ! 


10 


9 ; 30 


Warwick 


- 


- 


MM 


2 


- 1 2 


Watertown 


- 




- 






55o ! 550 


Wayland 


- 




- 


| 




30 30 


Webster 


- 




- 




7b 


- ! 7b 


Vfe lies ley- 




- 


M 

i i 


- 


1U5 1U5 


West Boyistori 


- 




- 




59 


59 


West Brookfield 


- 




- 




3 


3 


West SpringfielcL 


- 




- 


! 127 1 


- 


127 


We s thorough 


- 




- 


j ' ! 

j WW) 


23 


17 U0 


Westfield 


- 




- 


»5 | 


- 


3 1 bb 


Westford 


- 




5 




- 


5 1 10 


West ah 


- 




- 


1 " * 


- 


39 39 


Westport 


h2 




- 


' 


- 


- | U2 


Westwood 


- 




- 




1 


35 ! 36 


Weymouth 


- 




- 


1 """ 


- 


96 96 


Whitman 


— 




- 


I 


- 


7 


7 


Wilbraham 


- 




- 


! 37 


WW 


2 


39 


Williamsburg 


- 




- 


3 


- 


- 


3 


Williams town 


- 




- 


- 


- 


h \ k 


Wilmington 


- 




- 


- 


- 


27 27 


Winchendon 


- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Win Chester 


- 




- 


- 


- 


bb 


bb 


Winthrop 


- 




- 


- 


- 


95 


95 


Woburn 


- 




- 


*"" 


- 


126 


'126 


Worcester 


2 




h 


i 


W>8 


67 


U,5WL 


Wrentham 


- 




- 


„ 


- 


68 


68 '" 


Out of State 


mm 




97 


68 


13 


310 


U88 


TOTAL 


kj&9 


k,2ai 


h,7$6 


5,631 


26,939 


I 1+6,0^6 







■■- -: 1 .'..■■■■■;. '■ 



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